Properties in  Saxony Germany

Saxony's scenery is wild and romantic, with castles, palaces, and grand old homes among its mountains, meadows, valleys, and forest. The Elbe Sandstone Massif, with the Elbe River running through it, is particularly stunning. The Upper Lusatian moorlands are dotted with lakes, and the slopes of L�ssnitz are covered with trees and vines.

There are beautiful cities and towns in Saxony that feature numerous Renaissance, Baroque and other period buildings, like the capital Dresden, which has been called "Florence on the Elbe" due to its beautiful domed church and picturesque river view. Though the city was razed during World War II, it has been restored to its original glory.

Leipzig, a traditional merchant town, is a bustling cultural and commercial hub where many stores and concert venues can be found among its historic buildings. Another famous city in Saxony is Chemnitz, a long-time industrial centre full of stunning examples of Art Nouveau architecture and a famous opera house. G�rlitz, with thousands of period buildings listed for conservation, maintains its old medieval centre, surrounded by splendid well-preserved houses dating back to the 1870s. Bautzen is unique in being a Slavic enclave, with many traditional bars and inns. Over a thousand years old, it has a historic town centre and impressive medieval forts such as the enormous Ortenburg Castle. Zwickau, once home to classical composer Schumann, also has a historic town centre that has been beautifully restored.

There are also historic and affluent mining towns here, like Annaberg-Buchholz, Schneeberg, and Freiberg. Historically a silver-producing region, Saxony now hosts modern industries such as microchip production. Its economy is the fastest growing among the German states, however, it has a high unemployment rate and few investors.

Traditional crafts are still very much alive in this state. The areas of Plauen and G�ltzsch produce famous lace while Markneukirchen and Klingenthal maintain their 300-year-old tradition of crafting top-quality musical instruments. The Erzgebirge mountain region has been producing wooden handicrafts also for 300 years, while Meissen and Dresden produce world-renowned ceramics.

Dresden

The capital Dresden, often called "Florence on the Elbe" due to its beautiful domed church and picturesque river Elba, is home of many famous universities and venue for international music and art. Though the city was razed during World War II in a wave of controversial raids by the American and the British air forces, Dresden has been restored to its original glory. With Renaissance, baroque and 19th century architecture, the splendid cupola of the Church of Our Lady and the sweeping Elbe panorama, it is now experiencing a cultural revival. The river Elbe divides Dresden into the old city and the new city.

The old city, the Altstadt, on the left banks of the Elbe, has all the famous buildings and interesting sights lined up. The Green Vault, one of Europe's most sumptuous treasure chambers. It has the collection of the Wettin electors, which is now back in the Dresden Royal palace after 68 years. In World War II the collection escaped destruction - it was stored in a nearby fortress. After the war, the Red Army took it to Moscow.

Here, you'll see the Zwinger palace, the Art Gallery, the castle, the Semper Opera - a Neo Renaissance building, the Court Chapel and the Taschenberg Palace. The famous Baroque sandstone Frauenkirche dominates the Dresden skyline today as it did in the past, having been fully restored.

The new city, has a feel of middle-class baroque and shows what Dresden was like during the industrial revolution. The large district between Bautznerstrasse and Priessnitzstrasse, Bischofsweg and K�nigsbr�cker Strasse features many lovingly restored 18th and the 19th century buildings.

After reunification, new architectural styles emerged. Important modern buildings include the New Synagogue, a building with very few windows, the Transparent Factory, the Saxon State Parliament and the New Terrace, the UFA-Kristallpalast cinema, one of the biggest buildings of deconstructivism in Germany.

The architects, Daniel Liebeskind and Norman Foster modified some existing buildings. Foster roofed the main railway station with translucent Teflon-coated synthetics. Libeskind changed the whole structure of the Military History Museum by placing a wedge through the historicist arsenal building.

Leipzig

Leipzig is a bustling cultural and commercial hub where many stores and concert venues can be found among its historic buildings. It continued its long tradition of being a merchant town in the past and, after Hanover, is now another big hub of trade fairs, international congresses and events.

Leipzig is famous for music with two famous sons, Mendelsohn and Bach. The latter was a cantor in the church choir. Among its nicest buildings is the Old Town Hall, built between 1556 and 1557 in a renaissance style. It hosts the City History Museum with its famous rich collection.

Bach-Archives. Johann Sebastian Bach was Leipzig's musical director and choirmaster of the St Thomas Boys Choir between 1723 and 1750. The "Bach-Archiv" Leipzig is widely recognized as the world's most important centre of Bach scholarship. Comprising a research institute, a library and a museum, the Bach Archive today occupies the historic Bosehaus complex at St. Thomas Square, opposite the church.

Mendelssohn House. The only surviving residence of the composer Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, and the place where he died. Mendelssohn House is a museum, where many exhibits including his original furniture are on display.

Another famous city in Saxony is Chemnitz, a long-time industrial centre full of stunning examples of Art Nouveau architecture and a famous opera house.

G�rlitz, with thousands of period buildings listed for conservation, maintains its old medieval centre, surrounded by splendid well-preserved houses dating back to the 1870s.

Bautzen is unique in being a Slavic enclave, with many traditional bars and inns. Over a thousand years old, it has a historic town centre and impressive medieval forts such as the enormous Ortenburg Castle.

Zwickau, once home to Schumann, has a historic town centre that has been beautifully restored.

There are also historic and affluent mining towns, like Annaberg-Buchholz, Schneeberg, and Freiberg. Once famed as a silver-producing region, modern Saxony is now dominated by industries such as microchip production. Its economy is the fastest growing among the German states, but it has a high unemployment rate.

Traditional crafts are still very much alive in this state. The areas of Plauen and G�ltzsch produce famous lace while Markneukirchen and Klingenthal maintain their 300-year-old tradition of crafting top-quality musical instruments. The Erzgebirge mountain region has been producing wooden handicrafts also for 300 years, while Meissen has always been producing world-renowned porcelain and ceramics since 1710.


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